Choose one short story from Module 5 that we have not read, or select a film or

Choose one short story from Module 5 that we have not read, or select a film or series in the horror genre.  Read or view your selection and then respond to this discussion by addressing the following:
1. Briefly summarize the story you selected.
2. Then, briefly review the story. Watch the following video to learn about the components of a good review (you can skip the summary since you will have already written it). Your review does not need to be a formal essay, but be sure to include the essential information (author, title), your personal reflection on the story, and some critical analysis of at least one element of literature you found to be particularly good (or particularly bad).  Finally, give it your recommendation: thumbs up or thumbs down? This assignment will be approximately 500 words in length. 
Charles Dickens, “The Signal-Man,” 1866

myth of the labyrinth and minotaur

3. In the original myth of the labyrinth and minotaur, Ariadne “guides” Theseus through the labyrinth by providing him with a scarlet (or gold) thread. This idea of a guide is important in several of our readings. Discuss and compare in detail the role, purpose, and nature of the guide in at least four readings.

Dreams and sleep

2. Dreams and sleep are mentioned in many of our readings, starting from the original myth of the labyrinth. Discuss the significance of dreams and sleep in at least four readings, using examples and details from the readings, and also discuss the connections between the readings (related to sleep and dreams).

equilibrium and an efficient

What divergences arise between equilibrium and an efficient

What divergences arise between equilibrium and an efficient output when (a) negative externalities and (b) positive externalities are present? How might government correct these divergences? Cite an example (other than the text examples) of an external cost and an external benefit.Other examples of external costs might include secondhand smoke, noise from the stereo

down the hall, or road congestion. External benefits might be generated from outdoor Christmas lights, music from the stereo down the hall, or attractive landscaping in the neighborhood.

book name: Relentless: From Good to Great to Unstoppable by Tim S. Grover Ration

book name: Relentless: From Good to Great to Unstoppable by Tim S. Grover
Rationale:  
The main goal for writing this paper is analyze a popular culturerelationship book, using both personal and academic expertise to critique the claims made in the book.  In doing this, communication graduate students will demonstrate how to read various information sources, identify key features of each, critique and analyze these in a logical and orderly way, recognize overlaps with other materials, and then take a stand of their own.   Finally the practice of professional writing is a process, and this assignment adds to this process of practice and incremental improvement.
Basics for the Paper:
• 3-4 pages double spaced, 12 pt. font, standard margins• Professional objective writing style (“Based on evidence A, this means that…”) as opposed to subjective writing style (i.e., “I believe that…” “In my experience…”) • Title page  (title, name, school, date)• Properly cited paper and reference page in APA or MLA format (+3 academic sources)
Steps for Completion:
1. Acquire a pop-culture/self-help book that you haven’t read already.   Examples of books in recent history that fit this mold would be “Women are from Mars, men are from Venus,”  “He’s not that into you,”  “Coping with Difficult People.” Acquire professor’s approval for your selected text (DUE NEXT WEEK)2. Read the entire book, taking notes on aspects (i.e., ideas, arguments, examples) that jump out at you as significant or relevant to class, relational communication field or research, personal reasons, etc.3. Draft #1:   Organize your paper into three sections:  Overview of the book, three main points, and Conclusion/Summary.   NOTE:  Content in each section below represents ideas for what to write about, not necessarily a strict list of requirements.a. Overview:  This section should introduce the book and your critique, as well as give us a peek at the general relational ground the book covers, how it informs the reader (i.e., advice, description), and perhaps information about the writer.  It should ultimately convey the structure for the following section.b. Three Main Points:  Based on what you read, what jumps out at you as the most important aspects of the reading as they relate your experience of these ideas, the readings we do in this class, overlapping theory, or big picture society stuff?   Remember this is a communication class, so keep in mind the overall thrust should be about what your book and its points say about communication lessons/behavior/messages.c. Conclusion/Summary:  Pull it together…what do these three points (above) say in general about how the text informs not only a general “mainstream America” audience, but also relational/interpersonal/general communication scholars?  Is it garbage?  Informed garbage?  The new modern relationship handbook?  The next great American novel?  4. Draft #2:  After you have sufficiently walked away and thought about your ideas as they stand, rewrite, reject and reintroduce, or revise your previous draft.  Consider how ideas flow together, how you summarize the collection of points you make, and how you are using other academic sources or quotes within the primary book to support your points.  If a paragraph seems flimsy or on the other hand too cumbersome, consider what you want to say and if you are saying it with enough substance or too much.  Think about how paragraphs lead into each other.5. Final Draft #3:  After you have walked away again, read the paper for grammar, punctuation, quotation, or other writing issues.   Double check your use of objective vs. subjective writing (if you are confused or having trouble with this, read any of our assigned articles for ideas; they all use objective writing).  Double check your cited sources and your reference page, and ensure you’ve used proper format.  Correct tense confusion, passive vs. active voice mistakes, etc.6. Staple the paper in the upper-left hand corner of the paper.  Exhale.  Turn it in!
Final Checklist (before Turn-in):
o Page limit met (do not count title page and reference list toward page count)o Correct text size, color, spacing and formatting used o Writing structure reflects the three sections (Overview, Main Points, Conclusion)o Three academic sources have been used “in-text” to support claims in a substantive way, and also are not on our class reading list (you have found them independently)o Paragraphs are mostly between 3 and 6 sentences long.  o Evidence, in the form of citations and quotations, is accurately and completely cited according to APA or MLA style.o Reference page reflects APA or MLA style, and features everything you cite in the paper.o Staple in the upper right hand corner;  Pages are in the correct order.o Double check the entire document before you hand it in.  Everything should reflect your final and complete effort on the paper.
Dr. Beck’s Suggestions & Helpful Tips:
• Take clear (not excessive) notes as you read, with the goal of helping yourself to organize the paper later on.  When you are immersed in a text/source sometimes a connection to a theory, example, or another source is most clear at that particularmoment.  Don’t lose the moment!• Each of us knows how long it takes to write papers, but I’m asking you to write something “three drafts” worthy.  If you turn in a “one draft” worthy paper it will most likely show.  Put in the time and you will have a higher quality product (which is the bar for graduate level work).

The texts for this week show women in relationship with husbands, daughters, lov

The texts for this week show women in relationship with husbands, daughters, lovers, friends.
READINGs:  selection from The Norton Anthology of Literature by Women:
Choose one:
Hisaye Yamamoto: “Seventeen Syllables” (834–843)
Maxine W. Kumin: “Making the Jam without You” (913), “The Envelope” (915); “How It Is” (915), “Skinnydipping with William Wordsworth” (916-917), “Women and Horses” (917), “Sonnet in So Many Words” (918)
identify a relationship being described in one of these texts and explain how aesthetic elements as imagery, allusion, distinctive word choice, or metaphor) reinforce the nature of that relationship.
Respond in a 250-350 word MLA format.

1.What are your thoughtful reactions to Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie’s story ‘Birdso

1.What are your thoughtful reactions to Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie’s story ‘Birdsong”, Follow her use of language to indicate character predicament, her use of symbolism, and the story’s comment on gender relations in modern Lagos, Nigeria. Do you see any similarities  between the character’s predicament and the situation of women in the modern USA? Any differences?
2. “The sex life of African Girls’ by Selasi  unlike “Birdsong which uses the first person “I” is told in second  person. Why do you think Selasi used the second person to tell the story of a young girl’s dawning realization of the disturbing undercurrents around her? what do you think this story has to say about gender roles in middle class Accra? What do you make of the last line of the story

Rationale:   The main goal for writing this paper is analyze a popular culturere

Rationale:  
The main goal for writing this paper is analyze a popular culturerelationship book, using both personal and academic expertise to critique the claims made in the book.  In doing this, communication graduate students will demonstrate how to read various information sources, identify key features of each, critique and analyze these in a logical and orderly way, recognize overlaps with other materials, and then take a stand of their own.   Finally the practice of professional writing is a process, and this assignment adds to this process of practice and incremental improvement.
Basics for the Paper:
• 3-4 pages double spaced, 12 pt. font, standard margins• Professional objective writing style (“Based on evidence A, this means that…”) as opposed to subjective writing style (i.e., “I believe that…” “In my experience…”) • Title page  (title, name, school, date)• Properly cited paper and reference page in APA or MLA format (+3 academic sources)
Steps for Completion:
1. Acquire a pop-culture/self-help book that you haven’t read already.   Examples of books in recent history that fit this mold would be “Women are from Mars, men are from Venus,”  “He’s not that into you,”  “Coping with Difficult People.” Acquire professor’s approval for your selected text (DUE NEXT WEEK)2. Read the entire book, taking notes on aspects (i.e., ideas, arguments, examples) that jump out at you as significant or relevant to class, relational communication field or research, personal reasons, etc.3. Draft #1:   Organize your paper into three sections:  Overview of the book, three main points, and Conclusion/Summary.   NOTE:  Content in each section below represents ideas for what to write about, not necessarily a strict list of requirements.a. Overview:  This section should introduce the book and your critique, as well as give us a peek at the general relational ground the book covers, how it informs the reader (i.e., advice, description), and perhaps information about the writer.  It should ultimately convey the structure for the following section.b. Three Main Points:  Based on what you read, what jumps out at you as the most important aspects of the reading as they relate your experience of these ideas, the readings we do in this class, overlapping theory, or big picture society stuff?   Remember this is a communication class, so keep in mind the overall thrust should be about what your book and its points say about communication lessons/behavior/messages.c. Conclusion/Summary:  Pull it together…what do these three points (above) say in general about how the text informs not only a general “mainstream America” audience, but also relational/interpersonal/general communication scholars?  Is it garbage?  Informed garbage?  The new modern relationship handbook?  The next great American novel?  4. Draft #2:  After you have sufficiently walked away and thought about your ideas as they stand, rewrite, reject and reintroduce, or revise your previous draft.  Consider how ideas flow together, how you summarize the collection of points you make, and how you are using other academic sources or quotes within the primary book to support your points.  If a paragraph seems flimsy or on the other hand too cumbersome, consider what you want to say and if you are saying it with enough substance or too much.  Think about how paragraphs lead into each other.5. Final Draft #3:  After you have walked away again, read the paper for grammar, punctuation, quotation, or other writing issues.   Double check your use of objective vs. subjective writing (if you are confused or having trouble with this, read any of our assigned articles for ideas; they all use objective writing).  Double check your cited sources and your reference page, and ensure you’ve used proper format.  Correct tense confusion, passive vs. active voice mistakes, etc.6. Staple the paper in the upper-left hand corner of the paper.  Exhale.  Turn it in!
Final Checklist (before Turn-in):
o Page limit met (do not count title page and reference list toward page count)o Correct text size, color, spacing and formatting used o Writing structure reflects the three sections (Overview, Main Points, Conclusion)o Three academic sources have been used “in-text” to support claims in a substantive way, and also are not on our class reading list (you have found them independently)o Paragraphs are mostly between 3 and 6 sentences long.  o Evidence, in the form of citations and quotations, is accurately and completely cited according to APA or MLA style.o Reference page reflects APA or MLA style, and features everything you cite in the paper.o Staple in the upper right hand corner;  Pages are in the correct order.o Double check the entire document before you hand it in.  Everything should reflect your final and complete effort on the paper.
Dr. Beck’s Suggestions & Helpful Tips:
• Take clear (not excessive) notes as you read, with the goal of helping yourself to organize the paper later on.  When you are immersed in a text/source sometimes a connection to a theory, example, or another source is most clear at that particularmoment.  Don’t lose the moment!• Each of us knows how long it takes to write papers, but I’m asking you to write something “three drafts” worthy.  If you turn in a “one draft” worthy paper it will most likely show.  Put in the time and you will have a higher quality product (which is the bar for graduate level work).