the university’s academic culture and expectations

PACE 111B Program and Career Exploration in Business An orientation to UMGC and exploration of how UMGC academic programs align with professional goals and career options. The focus is on developing and practicing communication, teamwork, professionalism, and integrity skills while exploring ways to create and enhance career opportunities. The goal is to become familiar with the university’s academic culture and expectations; learn about UMGC resources for success; reflect on academic and professional goals, and explore opportunities to shorten programs through transfer credit and other prior learning.

solving the problems of financial policy

An overview of the theory, principles, and practices of financial management in a business environment. Topics include financial analysis and financial risk, characteristics and valuations of securities, capital investment analysis and decision making, the capital structure of the firm, financial leverage, and international finance. The aim is to examine financial information, identify issues and solve business problems, and make sound business decisions. Emphasis is on the application of financial theory and methods for solving the problems of financial policy that managers face

domestic and global business environment

A study of the relationship of business ethics and social responsibility in both domestic and global settings. The aim is to explore ethical and moral considerations of corporate conduct, social responsibilities, policies, and strategies. Emphasis is on the definition, scope, application, and analysis of ethical values as they relate to issues of public and organizational consequence and business decision making in the domestic and global business environment

the conceptual foundation gained through previous study

A study of strategic management that focuses on integrating management, marketing, finance/accounting, production/operations, services, research and development, and information systems functions to achieve organizational success. The aim is to apply integrative analysis, practical application, and critical thinking to the conceptual foundation gained through previous study and personal experience. Emphasis is on developing an organizational vision and mission, developing and implementing strategic plans, and evaluating outcomes.

citations from your reading.

Based on your selected case study, write a 350-word discussion post that addresses the following: Identify the moral dilemma or ethical decision being presented. Summarize the relevant facts. Identify the type/types of right vs. right principle (as identified by Kidder in the Ethical Decision Making and Action resource) and justify your selection with citations from your reading. Truth vs. loyalty Individual vs. community Short-term vs. long-term Justice vs. mercy Apply a recommended resolution considering the principles: rules-based, cares-based, ends based. Consider who wins and who loses, or propose a win-win alternative to the scenario. Your initial post (due on Day 3) should be at least 350 words and should reference at least two different academic sources.

personally can avoid the challenge.

Each field of work has one or more professional organizations that issue standards for that field. For Psychology it is APA; for educational leadership it is the Interstate School Leaders Licensure Consortium (ISLLC) that presents standards for leadership in education. Instructions For this written assignment, first research and review the standards that are most closely associated with the field in which you are interested. Specifically identify the standards that address ethics. Then write a 1,050- to 1,400-word (3-4 page) paper that addresses the following: Identify the ethical standards for your field of study. For each ethical standard, address why you believe the ethical standard is included and why it is important. Identify three current key ethical challenges facing individuals in your field of study. Explain why each challenge is important and how it should be addressed. Explain how you personally can avoid the challenge. Cite at least two scholarly sources in addition to the required reading that support your reflections.

remove the tracked changes from the artifacts

This week we will start the process of compiling your edited and polished work for the assessment portion of your portfolio, demonstrating your mastery of a selected learning outcome from your program. Instructions Select one learning outcome from your program of study. Then, select two graded artifacts (i.e., written assignments, projects, papers, discussion posts, or responses) that you feel best demonstrate your mastery of the selected program outcome. When selecting a previous work sample, you can review and retrieve your Waypoint assignments from previous courses from within Waypoint itself. Utilizing the feedback you received on these artifacts from your instructor as well as the things you have learned since submitting this work, revise and expand on these artifacts to create polished and corrected examples that you can add to your portfolio. Utilize track changes to make additions, corrections, and changes to your work in order for the instructor to review the changes that were made. Add two additional professional and current resources to support and improve your artifacts. Submit Combine the two updated artifacts (include track changes) into one document and submit via Waypoint. Then remove the tracked changes from the artifacts and add the polished and corrected artifacts to your portfolio with the correct heading and description of the selected program learning outcome. Insert a link to your portfolio in a Word document and submit via Waypoint. If needed, review the Week 1 Folio resources.

customers with unbranded or private label products

P&G conducted marketing research in Europe when it faced declining sales in Europe, more significantly in Germany. The research found that the threat to P&G was not from traditional rivals like Unilever, L’Oreal SA, etc., but from regional retailers, who were giving the company a tough fight. The research brought to light the fact that retail stores in Germany stocked unbranded diapers and detergents, that were sold at half the price of P&G’s products i.e. Pampers and Ariel respectively. The marketing research showed that one-fifth of all retail sales in Western Europe were attributed to private labels. In fact, the share of private label sales of total sales of the retailers was predicted to go up to 30 percent. One of the leading retail stores in Germany, Aldi, provided customers with unbranded or private label products, where they directly competed with the renowned products of P&G. For instance, Aldi stocked a private label product Putzmeister, a cleaner, to beat P&G’s Mr. Clean. Alarmed by the number of retail brands gaining a firm foothold in the retail market segment, Paul Polman, President for P&G Western Europe, decided to cut the prices of its commodities. As a part of this decision, the company reduced the price of the Pampers basic model to make the price range more affordable. The company followed yet another strategy by introducing even cheaper versions of its products. In this way, P&G avoided cutting down the prices of its existing products. For instance, the company launched Mr. Clean, a cheaper detergent version, instead of reducing the prices of Ariel. Meanwhile, the company also introduced and promoted improved versions of its premier and costlier models. P&G introduced a costlier version of Charmin, a toilet paper, to enhance sales in that product category. The company complemented the launch with an ad campaign that asked the consumers “Don’t you deserve a bit of luxury?” and tried to justify the high cost of the product. P&G also acquired Gillette Co, which made batteries and razors, to diversify and expand into more lucrative areas. The company took various steps to retain its brand image too. As a result of its efforts, the company’s net profit increased by 122 percent when compared to its sales during the previous three fiscal years. In India too, the company faced stiff competition from Hindustan Lever Limited (HLL), an FMCG company and a price war began. Until then, the Indian FMCG industry was in a sluggish state with the industry growth rate varying between 1 and 1.5 percent. However, the industry witnessed a revival, when the players in the sector resorted to price cuts. P&G resorted to price cuts to revive declining sales in its Indian operations. The company began its efforts by announcing price reductions on sachets of detergent products namely Ariel (from Rs 1.50 to Rs 1.00) and Tide (from Rs 3 to Rs 2). Soon afterward, the company announced a reduction of up to 50 percent on large packs (500 gm) of these products. While the price of Ariel went down from Rs 70 to Rs 50, the price of Tide was reduced from Rs 43 to Rs 23. HLL followed suit by reducing the price of its flagship detergent brand Surf Excel. P&G claimed that the sales of its detergent products doubled after the price cuts were implemented. P&G also had to deal with competition in the shampoo market, when HLL introduced ‘buy-one-get-one-free’ offer. Instead of resorting to price reductions, the company concentrated on heavily promoting its brand ‘Rejoice’ shampoo. Also, P&G introduced a line extension of its shampoo product ‘Pantene’. P&G’s share in the detergent market increased from 6 percent to 10 percent in one year. Analysts, however, were of the opinion that P&G had shifted its priority from being a value-based company to a volume-based company, in a bid to take on its rivals. Questions: 1. Is Procter & Gamble right in resorting to price cuts to revive its flagging sales? Discuss. 2. Comment on Procter & Gamble’s shift to a ‘volume-based’ company from a ‘value-based’ company.

marketing research in Europe

P&G conducted marketing research in Europe when it faced declining sales in Europe, more significantly in Germany. The research found that the threat to P&G was not from traditional rivals like Unilever, L’Oreal SA, etc., but from regional retailers, who were giving the company a tough fight. The research brought to light the fact that retail stores in Germany stocked unbranded diapers and detergents, that were sold at half the price of P&G’s products i.e. Pampers and Ariel respectively. The marketing research showed that one-fifth of all retail sales in Western Europe were attributed to private labels. In fact, the share of private label sales of total sales of the retailers was predicted to go up to 30 percent. One of the leading retail stores in Germany, Aldi, provided customers with unbranded or private label products, where they directly competed with the renowned products of P&G. For instance, Aldi stocked a private label product Putzmeister, a cleaner, to beat P&G’s Mr. Clean. Alarmed by the number of retail brands gaining a firm foothold in the retail market segment, Paul Polman, President for P&G Western Europe, decided to cut the prices of its commodities. As a part of this decision, the company reduced the price of the Pampers basic model to make the price range more affordable. The company followed yet another strategy by introducing even cheaper versions of its products. In this way, P&G avoided cutting down the prices of its existing products. For instance, the company launched Mr. Clean, a cheaper detergent version, instead of reducing the prices of Ariel. Meanwhile, the company also introduced and promoted improved versions of its premier and costlier models. P&G introduced a costlier version of Charmin, a toilet paper, to enhance sales in that product category. The company complemented the launch with an ad campaign that asked the consumers “Don’t you deserve a bit of luxury?” and tried to justify the high cost of the product. P&G also acquired Gillette Co, which made batteries and razors, to diversify and expand into more lucrative areas. The company took various steps to retain its brand image too. As a result of its efforts, the company’s net profit increased by 122 percent when compared to its sales during the previous three fiscal years. In India too, the company faced stiff competition from Hindustan Lever Limited (HLL), an FMCG company and a price war began. Until then, the Indian FMCG industry was in a sluggish state with the industry growth rate varying between 1 and 1.5 percent. However, the industry witnessed a revival, when the players in the sector resorted to price cuts. P&G resorted to price cuts to revive declining sales in its Indian operations. The company began its efforts by announcing price reductions on sachets of detergent products namely Ariel (from Rs 1.50 to Rs 1.00) and Tide (from Rs 3 to Rs 2). Soon afterward, the company announced a reduction of up to 50 percent on large packs (500 gm) of these products. While the price of Ariel went down from Rs 70 to Rs 50, the price of Tide was reduced from Rs 43 to Rs 23. HLL followed suit by reducing the price of its flagship detergent brand Surf Excel. P&G claimed that the sales of its detergent products doubled after the price cuts were implemented. P&G also had to deal with competition in the shampoo market, when HLL introduced ‘buy-one-get-one-free’ offer. Instead of resorting to price reductions, the company concentrated on heavily promoting its brand ‘Rejoice’ shampoo. Also, P&G introduced a line extension of its shampoo product ‘Pantene’. P&G’s share in the detergent market increased from 6 percent to 10 percent in one year. Analysts, however, were of the opinion that P&G had shifted its priority from being a value-based company to a volume-based company, in a bid to take on its rivals. Questions: 1. Is Procter & Gamble right in resorting to price cuts to revive its flagging sales? Discuss. 2. Comment on Procter & Gamble’s shift to a ‘volume-based’ company from a ‘value-based’ company.

Describe Your Company

The report should follow the following outline: 1. Describe Your Company Describe your imaginary company and its operations, its size, etc. It can be a service company or a company manufacturing a product. It can be an internet based company as long as the company’s overseas operations are such that it will experience all the challenges and opportunities faced by more traditional companies expanding overseas. In describing the operations of your imaginary company, ensure that you give a clear description of your business model and structure. For instance, if you operate a chain of coffee shops, where do you get your coffee from? If you manufacture a clothing line, do you have your own retail outlets or do you wholesale your product to existing retailers? If you repair an electronics product, e.g. smart phones, do you do this at the retail level or do you offer your services to existing large tech companies? 2. Describe Your Home and Host Countries The country where your company has been operating domestically will be U.S. In selecting a host country for international expansion, the country should be one of interest to the team, have potential for business expansion, and be a country where you can develop the type of information and insights you will need in developing your integrated project. Be sure that you explain your reasons for selection of your host country (see chapter 3 and criteria for selection of a host country, benefits, costs, and risks). 3. Decide on an Entry Strategy Describe your planned market entry strategy and give your reasons for this strategy. Also, how does your entry strategy relate to your core business strategy? See chapter 15. Note, to build a MNE, your entry strategy cannot be exporting or licensing. You have to set up some form of FDI in order to have operations in your host country. . 4. Describe the Environment in Which You Will Be Operating Your Company Describe the overseas environment you will be operating in and the critical operational, political, legal, and economic factors you must consider and how they will affect your company. Chapters 2 and 3 provide important background on the issues you should be describing, but you will have to do research on your particular host country, particularly whether it is developed or developing and its stage of development. 5. Describe the Cultural Profile of Your Host Country Provide a cultural profile of the local area in which you will be operating. What are the workers going to be like? What kind of reception do you anticipate from local government, suppliers, distributors, and so on? How will the culture affect your leadership and motivational approaches? Chapter 4 is important for this section of your report, but again, you will need to conduct research. 6. Describe Your Organization Chart Showing the Company and Its Overseas Operations Draw up an organization chart showing your company and its overseas operations. Describe why you have chosen this structure and how you will connect your overseas operation to headquarters. Also ensure that your structure and controls make sense in terms of your chosen business level strategy (cost reduction, localization, or both). Consult chapters 13 and particularly chapter 14. 7. Decide on a Staffing Policy for Top Level Managers in Your Overseas Operations How will you staff your management positions in your overseas operations? What is your rationale for this approach? Consult chapter 19. 8. Describe the Kinds of Leadership and Motivational Systems You Will Use Given the culture where your overseas entity will be operating, what kind of leadership and motivational systems and practices do you think will be most effective? Consult chapter 14 and read the case on Lincoln Electric (page 419) where what worked in the U.S. was a cultural and motivational disaster overseas. 9. Discuss the Kinds of Communications Issues Your Company May Face Discuss the kinds of communications problems your company may face in the host country working environment. How should they prepare for and deal with these problems? Consult chapter 4 on culture and understand difference between high and low context communications. 10. Discuss Any Special Control Issues Your Company May Face in Its Overseas Operations Explain any special control issues for your overseas operations that concern you. How do you plan to deal with them? There is a host of potential control issues, e.g. protecting intellectual property, protecting against graft, quality control, protecting your brand, etc. Chapters 2, 3, and 5 are relevant here, but you will have to think about your operations and do research on the particular circumstances to be faced in your host country. 11. Identify Concerns of the Host Country and the Local Community Identify the concerns of the host country and the local community regarding your operations there. What plans do you have to deal with their concerns and to ensure a long-term cooperative relationship? For instance, local concerns may relate to such matters as environmental pollution, creating jobs, following government regulations, employee training, and advancing new technologies, etc. Here you have to think politically and what you need to do to be accepted and ideally welcomed in your host country. This will require research on the particular concerns and issues of your host. List references used at the end or in endnotes. Include in-text citations when you used secondary resources, as you would in any paper.