Read the following introduction and the primary document linked below. Then answ

Read the following introduction and the primary document linked below. Then answer the following questions in essay format (Essay should be one page long )
What type of document is the Chinese Exclusion Act? When was it enacted? Does the document give any hint as to why the Chinese are to be excluded? If not, why do you think that they were refused entry into the nation? This Act was rolled out four years prior to the celebration and unveiling of the Statue of Liberty in New York and the Act was in effect even then. Do you see any contradiction in these two events? Why or why not? 
Links: https://guides.loc.gov/chinese-exclusion-act
https://www.loc.gov/law/help/statutes-at-large/47th-congress/session-1/c47s1ch126.pdf
due in 6 hours

“A bill of rights is what the people are entitled to against every government on

“A bill of rights is what the people are entitled to against every government on earth.” – Thomas Jefferson
In 1783 American colonists, defying incredible odds, had just beaten the United Kingdom, the western hemisphere’s preeminent power, in the American War for Independence. (NPS.gov, n.d.) Those thirteen colonies, saddled with a new governmental charter, the Articles of Confederation, sought to chart their own, independent path. (Gilderlehrman, n.d.) As a result, in 1787 disgruntled colonists sent delegates to Philadelphia with the task of revising the dysfunctional Articles of Confederation. In a radical departure, most delegates opted against amending the existing constitution, and instead, created a new Constitution. (OConnor & Sabato, 2019)
During the four-month Constitutional Convention, the delegates readily agreed upon James Madison’s basic premise of a new United States government delineated along three branches: legislative, executive, and judicial. That said, most delegates envisioned a strong legislative body and a weak executive office. Real disagreements arose regarding the composition of the legislative body, in particular the election and responsibilities of senators. Slavery proved a vexing issue to which a compromise allowed slaves to be partially counted for Congressional representation. (Maier, 2011)
One of the last arguments of the convention involved the question of whether to include a “Bill of Rights” within the U.S. Constitution. Many delegates did not believe that a Bill of Rights was a necessary component. After the Constitutional Convention and during the Constitution’s ratification, James Madison consented to Thomas Jefferson’s concerns regarding individual liberty and thus pledged to add additional amendments that would codify an individual’s rights within the federal government. During the first session of Congress in 1789, Madison composed a series of Amendments designed to safeguard a citizen’s individual liberties from a potentially powerful federal government, which are now collectively known as the Bill of Rights. (Maier, 2011)
The debate over the Bill of Rights, among other significant concerns, later split the Founding Fathers into two political camps: the Federalists and Antifederalists. These groups later became this country’s first set of political parties, and notably, established a dominant, two-party system.
More information about the Constitutional Convention can be found with the U.S. State Department’s Office of the Historian.
Although a living document, the original writing of the U.S. Constitution reflected the political, social, and economic factors particular to late Eighteenth-century America. During the Constitutional Convention, the delegates included and/or excluded content within the Constitution that reflected the historical and/or philosophical concerns from their own perspectives: steeped in the philosophies of the European Enlightenment, formed by memories of a war of independence against Imperial Great Britain, cognizant of the current failures of the current constitution, and alarmed by the post-independence civil unrest. (Lumens, 2019)
Directions: Using the required, academic readings, and supplemental academic research, please address the following while adhering to the Discussion Board Rubric:
Briefly describe the powers the Constitution gives to the executive, legislative, and judicial branches.
What Article within the Constitution explains how the Constitution can be changed?
What was the purpose of the Preamble of the U.S. Constitution?
Select two Articles, Sections, and/or Clauses within the 1789 U.S. Constitution.
You may pick from Articles I-VII and the first ten Amendments.*
Note: If you pick an Article, you may decide to focus on a particular Section or Clause within the Article. For example: Article 1, Section 8, Clause 1: “The Congress shall have power to lay and collect taxes, duties, imposts and excises, to pay the debts and provide for the common defense and general welfare of the United States; but all duties, imposts and excises shall be uniform throughout the United States.”
Explain in specific detail how historical and/or philosophical influences resulted in the writing of this component of the U.S. Constitution.
Why did you pick your chosen examples?
Did the chosen examples ultimately benefit the U.S. government? Why?
*You may pick an example that was proposed during the Constitutional Convention but did not survive the final writing of the U.S. Constitution.
References:
Article Articles of Confederation. (n.d.). Retrieved from https://www.gilderlehrman.org/sites/default/files/inline-pdfs/T-04759.pdf.
Maier, P. (2011). Ratification: the people debate the Constitution, 1787-1788. New York, NY: Simon & Schuster.
Learning, L. (n.d.). US History I (AY Collection). Retrieved from https://courses.lumenlearning.com/suny-ushistory1ay/chapter/shays-rebellion/.
McLean, J. (n.d.). History of Western Civilization II. Retrieved from https://courses.lumenlearning.com/suny-hccc-worldhistory2/chapter/the-age-of-enlightenment/.
National Constitution Center. (n.d.). Retrieved from https://constitutioncenter.org/.
OConnor, K., & Sabato, L. (2019). American government: roots and reform. Columbus: Pearson.
Constitutional Convention and Ratification, 1787–1789 (n.d.). Retrieved from https://history.state.gov/milestones/1784-1800/convention-and-ratification.
The Bill of Rights: A Transcription. (n.d.). Retrieved from https://www.archives.gov/founding-docs/bill-of-rights-transcript.
The Constitution of the United States: A Transcription. (n.d.). Retrieved from https://www.archives.gov/founding-docs/constitution-transcript.
Timeline of the War for Independence. (n.d.). Retrieved from https://www.nps.gov/waro/learn/historyculture/timeline-of-the-war-for-independence.htm.

Prompt (Choose One): 1. Evaluate the impact of the expansion of capitalism, wage

Prompt (Choose One):
1. Evaluate the impact of the expansion of capitalism, wage labor, and manufacturing into the “New South” and “Old West” from 1877-1900.
2. Explain the relationship of urbanization, immigration, and industrialization with the national political events of from 1877-1900 including partisan elections, national legislative reforms, and political behavior of voters.
3. From 1877-1900, what role did racial and/or ethnic prejudice play in the social history of the nation. Discuss the South, West, and North/East.
Format:
1000 words
Double space
12-point font
Standard written English
One-inch margins
Chicago style footnote citations. Do not cite in MLA style.

Write a paper on  the following (4 pages) The sit-in movement How does this also

Write a paper on  the following (4 pages) The sit-in movement
How does this also relate to a school setting, with the students involved in the sit-in?
Sit-in movement, nonviolent movement of the U.S. civil rights era that began in Greensboro, North Carolina, in 1960.
The sit-in, an act of civil disobedience, was a tactic that aroused sympathy for the demonstrators among moderates and uninvolved individuals. African Americans (later joined by white activists), usually students, would go to segregated lunch counters (luncheonettes), sit in all available spaces, request service, and then refuse to leave when denied service because of their race.

Read this first:  onehundredpercentamerican.pdf Close your eyes. When you hear t

Read this first: 
onehundredpercentamerican.pdf
Close your eyes. When you hear the phrase “real American,” what do you picture?
The Ku Klux Klan was founded in 1886, when some White Southerners decided to resist the legal equality of Blacks and Whites that had been established during Reconstruction. The Klan claimed that White Christians were superior to people of other racial, ethnic, and religious backgrounds. The Klan secretly organized illegal activities, including intimidating and lynching Black people, other minority groups, and those who disagreed with them. The period 1920–1929 is known as the Roaring Twenties or the Jazz Age. This period is known for economic prosperity, new freedoms for women, and a surge in creativity among Black artists.
Document: The Klan’s Fight for Americanism, Hiram W. Evans, 1926
The Klan, therefore, has now come to speak for the great mass of Americans of the old pioneer stock. We believe that it does fairly and faithfully represent them, and our proof lies in their support. To understand the Klan, then, it is necessary to understand the character and the present mind of the mass of old-stock Americans. The mass, it must be remembered, as distinguished from the intellectually mongrelized “Liberals.” These are, in the first place, a blend of various peoples of the so-called Nordic race, the race which, with all its faults, has given the world almost the whole of modern civilization…. The Nordic American today is a stranger in large parts of the land his father gave him. Moreover, he is a most unwelcome stranger, one much spit upon, and one to whom even the right to have his own opinions and to work for his own interests is now denied with jeers and revilings. 
They [Nordic Americans] decided that … an alien usually remains an alien no matter what is done to him, what veneer of education he gets, what oaths he takes, nor what public attitudes he adopts. They decided that the melting pot was a ghastly failure, and remembered that the very name was coined by a member of one of the races—the Jews—which most determinedly refuses to melt. They decided that in every way, as well as in politics, the alien in the vast majority of cases is unalterably fixed in his instincts, character, thought and interest by centuries of racial selection and development, that he thinks first for his own people, works only with and for them, cares entirely for their interests, considers himself always one of them, and never an American. They [Nordic Americans] learned, though more slowly, that alien ideas are just as dangerous to us as the aliens themselves, no matter how plausible such ideas may sound. With most of the plain people this conclusion is based simply on the fact that the alien ideas do not work well for them. Others went deeper and came to understand that the differences in racial background, in breeding, instinct, character and emotional point of view are more important than logic. So ideas which may be perfectly healthy for an alien may also be poisonous for Americans.
Finally they [Nordic Americans] learned the great secret of the propagandists; that success in corrupting public opinion depends on putting out the subversive ideas without revealing their source. They came to suspect that “prejudice” against foreign ideas is really a protective device of nature against mental food that may be indigestible. They saw, finally, that the alien leaders in America act on this theory, and that there is a steady flood of alien ideas being spread over the country, always carefully disguised as American. We [the Klan] are demanding, and we expect, to win, a return of power into the hands of the everyday, not highly cultured, not overly intellectualized, but entirely unspoiled and not de-Americanized, average citizen of the old stock.
1. How does Evans define a “real American”? What evidence does Evans provide that the “melting pot” is a failure?
2. What does Evan see as the true reason for prejudice of “real” Americans against “aliens”?
3. What is your own definition of a “real” American?
4.Do you agree with Evans that immigrants never consider themselves American? What evidence could you provide to support your claim?
This link will provide you with some guidance on using Chicago Style.

Read the following introduction and the primary document linked below. Then answ

Read the following introduction and the primary document linked below. Then answer the following questions in essay format (Essay should be one page long )
What type of document is the Chinese Exclusion Act? When was it enacted? Does the document give any hint as to why the Chinese are to be excluded? If not, why do you think that they were refused entry into the nation? This Act was rolled out four years prior to the celebration and unveiling of the Statue of Liberty in New York and the Act was in effect even then. Do you see any contradiction in these two events? Why or why not? 
Links: https://guides.loc.gov/chinese-exclusion-act
https://www.loc.gov/law/help/statutes-at-large/47th-congress/session-1/c47s1ch126.pdf
due in 6 hours

100-150 per question Questions to Consider: 1) How did the massive immigration o

100-150 per question
Questions to Consider:
1) How did the massive immigration of the 1840’s influence the balance of power between the Whig and Democratic parties?
2) What economic and political forces fed westward expansion during the 1840s?
3) What tactics used by President James K. Polk to unite the Democratic party behind a program of westward expansion threatened war with both Britain and Mexico?  How did the Democrats “sell” Texas annexation to the North in the election of 1844?
4) How did the outcome of the Mexican-American War intensify intersectional conflict? Why, specifically, did it split the Democratic party?

How has the automobile impacted American society? In the 1950s the United States

How has the automobile impacted American society?
In the 1950s the United States enjoyed a broad-based, unprecedented level of prosperity. Rising purchasing power, expanding credit, and a rapidly growing advertising industry stimulated consumerism. One industry that rapidly developed and expanded was the automobile industry. During the 1950s, Americans purchased 58 million cars. By 1960, 75 percent of American families owned one. The automobile created mobility on a scale not known before, and the automobile industry became a vital element in the economy. It became one of the world’s major manufacturing industries. The automobile dramatically impacted American society, whether you owned one or not.
Sources must be cited in your discussion. 
QUESTION: Discuss how the automobile positively or negatively impacted American society.

Read the Jane Addams Article, “Why Women Should Vote” -link to text provided – h

Read the Jane Addams Article, “Why Women Should Vote” -link to text provided – http://www.digitalhistory.uh.edu/disp_textbook.cfm?smtid=3&psid=3609 
Write an essay describing the tactics Addams uses to convince readers of her cause. Who was her primary audience, based upon the publication? What connection does Addams make between women gaining the vote and positive changes to both society and her own household?  Is Addams appealing to her readers’ passion for a greater political voice, or to their domesticity? What social ills, according to Addams, could be cured if women could vote? Is her piece convincing?
Essay should be at least 2 full pages in length, typed, double-spaced with standard margins.